My Art

My favorite piece from this semester was easy for me, the Ruscha/Rosenquist assignment! As soon as we discussed the assignment in class, my creative juices started flowing. What with the government shut down on everyone’s minds, I had been especially interested in the National Parks closing. As soon as I had my social issue, I began brainstorming. My brainstorming filled a page, and then another.. and I was more than excited to start my project! After speaking to Anna, she informed me that they were still drilling for oil in 12 of the parks, yet they were closed to the public. this got me interested in focusing on the ‘oil’ aspect.. and sparked the idea for using some… substitutes for traditional paint. I was very happy with my finished piece, and although motor oil dripped down the walls of the fine art building for a few weeks, I really enjoyed having created a piece that represented a social issue that I was passionate about.. and the ideas for the content all came from my imagination.. I really felt like this project sparked my creative traits for a few weeks, and really got me working on my art. ImageImage

Marci Hohner 

Shel Silverstein

Shel Silverstein

This piece, “The Thinker of Tender Thoughts” by Shel Silverstein, has always been one of my favorite pieces of art. My mother is a 4th grade teacher and absolutely loves old TV shows that carry subtle but important messages about how to be a good person and what-not. Shel Silverstein’s poems and art commonly have themes of being a free person or being a good person, but always stick to the comical side. Looking at it later in life, the message behind “the Thinker of Tender Thoughts” almost makes me want to cry, as it is so simple and relatable. Simple as lines on paper, the look on his face when he decides to fit in by cutting his wily hair is so expressive and content, whereas many other pieces that address this type of theme treat the “trimming” stage (“giving in to the man”) as a very negative thing.
I hope kids still have to read Shel Silverstein’s work because it is some very pure, happy work. I haven’t kept up on children’s book but I’d guess that few works surpass Shel Silverstein’s work in honesty, morality, and meaning.

“I will not play at tug o’ war.
I’d rather play at hug o’ war,
Where everyone hugs
Instead of tugs,
Where everyone giggles
And rolls on the rug,
Where everyone kisses,
And everyone grins,
And everyone cuddles,
And everyone wins.”

Chris Van Allsburg

Chris Van Allsburg

Children’s book author and illustrator, Chris Van Allsburg’s art haunted me as a child. Almost photorealistic, the images in “The Mysteries of Harris Burdick” are bleak and… mysterious. Black and white and very simple, they make you think. For example, the picture posted here says “the fifth one ended up in France”. The audience assumes the “fifth one” is another nun in a flying chair. There is no more explanation and there won’t be. Like a few other books that we read in our childhoods, this one skirted the edge between children’s book and down-right gloomy.

Van Allsburg also illustrated for Jumanji and The Polar Express.

post of my stuff

(sorry for the low quality of the photos)
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This is my work of art; I created it almost two years ago, and removed them the past summer. I decorated one of my closets at my apartment which I placed a chair in there, pasted random magazine pages at the background, and placed a light in there. I used to read books and use computer at there.(i know that sounds pretty weird) 

first post: Junaida

first post: Junaida

Junaida is a Japanese artist who lives in Kyoto, Japan. I always obsessed with his art of works because they are ideal and fantasy that are as same as fairy tale. His drawings always contain many western buildings which usually mixed with in an object. On the other hand, I like how he uses the colors for his works which created a smoothy image.

if you would interested in this artist, you should go to his website: http://junaida.com

Noon

Noon

“Noon” by Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner was an abstract expressionistic artist who lived from 1908-1984.  Her birth name was Lena Krassner.  She lived in New York and studied at The Cooper Union and the National Academy of Design.  She was married to Jackson Pollock, another abstract painter, for roughly ten years.  Most of hers and Jackson’s paintings look like this, with splotches of paint blending together to create a mass of color rather than a shape.  I like “Noon” in particular because the colors remind me of a beach party and the short, thin strokes produce a calming effect.  Though not a fan of abstract art, I might hang this on my wall.